Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Origami Paper Boxes, by Mark Bolitho. Review.


By Mark Bolitho

Published by Jacqui  Small, an imprint of the Quarto Group 2018

Paperback (includes pack of 32 sheets of origami paper, patterned + plain),

£14.99 UK/ $19.99 US/$25.99 CAN

ISBN 978-1-9111-27-13-0



Star rating: *****



Mark Bolitho, former chairman of the British Origami Society, is a prolific origami author.  His themed origami books are a delight to behold. Origami Paper Boxes, a new title of his, has particular appeal for general papercrafters, since many of the boxes can be used for packaging small gifts. 


Like so many books these days, an emphasis is placed on the mindful benefits of origami. Peaceful concentration is required to produce the models, and you will also experience awe as you witness the wonder of geometric perfection.


The book features more than 25 boxes presented in four different categories: Classic Designs, Modern Boxes, Two-Piece Boxes, and Modular Boxes. There a several swirl-close boxes, and a sweet mini-shopping bag style called Pinch. The unit-pieced modular designs are all named after tea varieties. The Lapsang Box is hexagonal and  features an appealing diagonal effect. 


A handy feature of the book is that each project is accompanied by a diagram indicating the dimensions of the completed model (when constructed with an 18 x 18 / 7 x 7 in origami sheet).


The projects are attractively photographed, and are accompanied by clear folding diagrams and instructional copy. Star ratings for complexity are assigned – so you can opt for quick results or a challenging folding experience.

The pack of origami paper, tucked inside the back cover, is a good mix of plains and patterns, all coloured on the flip side.


I really had to focus hard on writing this review – I was so tempted to try my hand at making the lovely Origami Paper Boxes.



Note:  I was given a review copy of this title.

Monday, 21 May 2018

Print-It Pleat-It Zinnia

More dimensional - offset graduated layers!



I'm thinking flowers (it's the Chelsea Flower Show) - but mine are papercrafted - and pleated. This pretty zinnia is pleated from a strip of paper. The printed design indicates how to fold it. 

The flower head and leaves are attached to a cake pop stick. You can embellish a cake or cupcake with a flower - or you can camouflage a lollipop (sweet for goody bags).

Here are your free print-and-cut templates:
Print-ItPleat-ItZinna.svg 
Print-ItPleat-ItZinnia.pdf 

I print my flowers on 160gsm photocopier card, but you can also use lighter weight printer paper. When you crease the folds, the flower head folds into shape. Swirl the flower into a circle, tucking the tabs over on the front. Secure the flower on the back with a snippet of adhesive mailing label (that is also how to attach the flower head to the cake pop stick). The leaves slide in place through the self-loop.

For a more 3-D effect, cut graduated layers and offset them.

Enjoy printing and pleating your flowers!
 

Sunday, 13 May 2018

Precious Paper, by Bianca Capello. Review.

Precious Paper: Paper Jewellery Design
By Bianca Capello
Skira Editore, March 2018
Hardcover, 32 pages (Dual language: English-Italian), £22.50
ISBN: 978-88-572-3529-5

This unique publication is sponsored by Comieco, a body that advocates the recycling of paper products). It contains 21 die-cut and ready-to-assemble designer jewellery creations, fashioned from environmentally-friendly card in a range of rich, jewel-like colours.The die-cuts come in a folder attached to the book’s front cover. 

There are designs for necklaces, bracelets, the exquisite tiara gracing the cover, plus a delightful paper figurine that perches on a bookshelf. Each jewellery design is accompanied by a beauty shot of the project and an author-bio – so you learn each designer’s background and what makes them tick. Further info on each piece is available via scanning a QR code. 

By making the pieces you will learn about paper manipulation techniques.Much fun is to be had with eco-concious papercrafting.

Upfront, there is a concise – and extremely scholarly – history of paper in general, plus a history of paper jewellery specifically. Lots of fascinating facts – and papercraft greats are name-checked. 

 Designed by Caterina Crepax, (c) Skira Editore 2018.



The delightful fashionable figure above is meant to be an unconventional
bracelet when coiled around your wrist. When folded, it can perch whimsically  on a bookshelf.

Note: I was supplied with a review copy of this title.