Sunday, 6 December 2015

Toast Rack Card Racks 2015

Here are my toast rack-style card racks, 2015 edition. They are handy for those of you who prefer to browse, rather than display greetings cards - or to handle the overflow. 

Here are toasties 2015:
ToastRack15SidesGreen.pdf 
ToastRack15WhiteBody.pdf 
ToastRack15SidesWhite.pdf 
ToastRack15GreenBody.pdf 

ToastRackCardRack2015.studio3 


There are separate .pdf files. The Silhouette digi-cut file has all the toast rack components in it.

You can mix and match the toast rack sides and bodies to make different colour combinations.

To make the toast rack:

1 Print the rack components. Two sides and one body per rack.

2 With a fine-point embossing tool and a small metal ruler, score the fold lines (indicated by notches on the body).

3 Cut the toast rack components out, either by hand or digitally. By hand, you will need a craft knife an ruler to cut the slots.

4 Carefully crease the folds. To fold the toast rack body, place a small metal ruler behind the fold line before creasing it.

6 Attach a toast rack side to either side of the toast rack body base. Use double-sided tape or tacky PVA glue.

7 Fold the toast rack, gluing the side tabs and finally, the long base tab.

I like to flat-pack the toast racks and send them as card enclosures. I have provided you with a printable label. You can partially assemble the toast rack (I like to attach the ends to the body), then fold along the creases and pop it into a cello bag.


Christopher Dresser's Victorian toast racks.

I am not the only designer to be into toast rack permutations! I have a very emininent predecessor - the visionary Victorian industrial designer
Christopher Dresser had a thing for silver toast racks. Check it out on Google images! His designs are amazingly inventive.